Studio Artists

Clay Space private studios are occupied by an eclectic groups of individuals representing a variety of disciplines and interests.
Current Clay Space Studio Artists
Barbara Herman | Ceramics
Jim Laub | Ceramics
Kathy Turner | Ceramics
Helen Kaufman | Ceramics
Drew Harrington | Mixed Media
Meadow Scott | Ceramics
Aaron Dick | Ceramics
Keiley Ruiz | Ceramics
Mariah Rose Williams | Ceramics
Artist Statements
Barbara Herman

My pottery is primarily wheel thrown porcelain. My pieces are inspired by garden scenes. I derive my designs from actual places I have been or from my imagination. The brushwork is influenced by Chinese brush painting. I love to paint and I love to use clay. Combining painting with clay work is a natural evolution for me. My hope is that each piece is delightful to use.



Helen Kaufman

 

Upon entering the studio, as I uncover my work, my mind’s eye sees the next step in its emergence. I reach for the tool that will define the contour… slowly carving, moving more rapidly as the process takes over and I leave my everyday self behind.

 

Each time I begin a new piece by choosing a size and shape of solid, moist clay. My fingers, hands and sponge begin with a shape, line or opening and one motion leads to the next as the form emerges. As the clay dries, I use wire sculpting tools to further define the form. Over time I have experimented with how much clay can be removed from the interior, creating a deeply carved, complex three-dimensional form. Though I do not work from models or drawings, the sculptures remind viewers of the form, rhythm and movement found in the natural world.

 

I’m an avid explorer of the inner and outer landscape; I still throw a few pots — but spend most of my time sculpting clay and enjoying the facility and people at Clay Space.


About Helen:

Helen Kaufman is one our private studio artists. She has shown her work at a number of places — currently her work is showing in Oregon at Earthworks in Yachats. In June, Helen will be showing work at the Guardino Gallery on Alberta St. in Portland, with an opening on Thursday, May 31st.

 

Helen’s love of clay dates back to the 1970’s when she spent ten years as a studio potter and the co-owner of Clay Pigeons in Riverdale, NY. After years in the studio, Helen returned to graduate school and spent the next ten years as student and Art Therapist. She feels that her experience as a clinician has deepened her appreciation of the relationship between creativity and healing. 

 

In 2015, Helen, with her husband George, moved from New York to Eugene. Having spent time exploring the studio options in Eugene, it was clear that Clay Space was a perfect place for her to continue her work with clay.




Meadow Scott


I have been making purely functional pottery for more than 20 years. I find the tangible world enchanting, and am compelled by forms that “feel good” in our hands for reasons we can’t explain and don’t even usually notice, but are strongly affected by nonetheless. I love the inherent tension of clay, which is ultimately earthy and carries the weight and permanence of rock itself, yet is formed in an ephemeral moment of incredible fluidity.


And then there is the act of eating. A beautiful dish inspires you to slow down, be here in this moment, and notice how beautiful the food itself is, after all. How beautiful is the abundance of the Earth that feeds us! How precious that moment is in your day when you sit down with your dish of food and take part in that oldest of rituals….

I believe handmade dishes connect us to all of these things —  the physical world, the spiritual world, beauty, sustenance, earth, humanity, permanence, change. But after all my nuance and deep thoughts about functional pottery, I love that it remains unshakably straightforward. It’s a mug. It fits nicely in your hand. It has pretty colors. It holds something you like to drink. It’s simple, useful and beautiful, and I consider it a privilege to bring it into this world.

 

www.dishcraftpottery.com









Drew Harrington

 

I paint imagined moments in time—abstracted, and often imprinted by humans or animals. I hope to suggest movement and mystery in my work.

My compositions are shaped by the color and geography of both my native southwest and the beautiful northwest where I now live and work.

 

Drew Harrington

harringd555@gmail.com

















Mariah Rose Williams

Utilizing the potter’s wheel as a primary tool, I create porcelain vessels inspired by my interests in Eastern Philosophy and Asian ceramics. My fascination with Asian ceramics stems from functional forms created during the Song and Ming Dynasties in China. Particularly inspiring are the works adorned with the sacred lotus flower and glazed in traditional celadon. The methodologies of Eastern Philosophy and design have truly fascinated me and significantly influenced my work.

Functionality generates a purpose for my designs, but I often consider form over function. I strive to create vessels that don’t have a specific intended use, but rather allowing a form to generate it’s own purpose. I contemplate filling these vessels with elements of vitality, nourishment or plant life, giving the forms an essential impact on life.

The processes involved in pottery making motivate me and allows for constant reflection. The never-ending challenges that arise keep me excited, and the subtleties embedded within each form continually captivate me.
Donna Yutzy

As a jewelry designer, I am tempted by textures and persuaded by patterns. These characteristics are inherent in every piece I produce, from a simple pin or pair of earrings to the most intricately woven chain, sculpted pendant, or paneled bracelet.

 

I make all of my jewelry from special clay that contains tiny particles of silver mined from recycled metal. Silver clay, as it is called, is a delightful and limitless medium. It can be shaped, carved, molded, stamped, and sculpted. And once it’s fired, it can be highly polished or less so, and finished with pearls, stones, glass beads, or other unusual artifacts.

 

Every piece is unique. Though I usually sketch out an idea ahead of time, I find that mood, materials, and the creative process often determine the final design. My most popular and best-selling pieces are usually ones that I made for myself.

 

The pieces in my current collection are inspired by nature — random swirls in sand or snow, the twists and turns of a tree branch, the motion of grasses swaying in the wind. A splash of gold adds warmth and brightness, in sharp contrast to Oregon’s dreary winter days. 

 

As an avid cyclist, I tend to thrive on forward motion. But designing and fashioning jewelry out of metal clay helps me feel calm and centered. In addition to teaching metal clay classes each month, I try to take at least one course annually from a new instructor to help generate inspiration and provide time for self-reflection.



Barbara Herman
Barbara Herman
Barbara Herman
Helen Kaufman
Helen Kaufman
Meadow Scott
Meadow Scott
Drew Harrington
Drew Harrington
Mariah Rose Williams
Donna Yutzy