Member Artists

Shannon Hardin

I have been a creative person my whole life. I took every art class that was offered in high school, but never even thought about making jewelry. My house is a testament to my creativity. I know that I drive my family crazy with all the bright colors and art collections all through the house.

While looking for work in 2005, I realized that I needed to do something creative to occupy my time after days of sending out resumes and scheduling interviews. I had a friend show me how to do basic wire work and the rest is, as they say, history!

Finding the hobby to fill my time has taken on a new meaning. I have fallen in love with the whole process of jewelry making from start to finish. Viewing the colors and handling the materials feed my creative passion. Designing a piece of jewelry, no matter how simple or complicated, is a huge joy. I get excited just thinking about going to a bead shop or show.

I use primarily glass beads, fresh water pearls, silver, silver-plate and copper. My one-of-a-kind bracelets, necklaces and earrings are as much fun to make as they are to wear. I enjoy teaching others how to make jewelry and continue to learn new techniques through my exploration of books, magazines and online tutorials.

(Shannon has been offering jewelry workshops through Clay Space for the 
past 3 years.)
Damon Harris

Damon Harris has been working as an artist at Clay Space over the past four years. He received his MFA from University of Oregon in 2009 following a BFA at Murray State University in Kentucky in 2005. Currently, he is working at Clay Space with Jim and Josh on the clay press production project.

His immediate interest has been in producing a vast number of pyramid shaped ceramic pieces (count 300 here!) that will form the main components of an installation at The Wave Gallery, 547 Blair Street.

The exhibit opens on Friday, June 7th, 2013 from 7-9pm and continues through June.

The following is from Damon's artist statement:

Watching the television footage of NASA's Curiosity Rover land on the surface of Mars, I was reminded how the most highly advanced man-made objects, designed to operate at the very edge of what is possible or knowable, look particularly exposed and vulnerable despite their mind boggling complexity. I see a parallel between unwieldy milestones of scientific advancement and the fragile, makeshift shelters I built as a child, using natural or discarded materials found in the woods surrounding my parents’ house. Both feel like attempts to simultaneously engage in and be insulated from that which is physically and conceptually uncharted.

Bonnie King

I love the feeling of clay and love that it can take so many different forms. I like to envision my creations in gardens or on porches with pretty plants surrounding them.

I have always enjoyed playing in dirt, making mud pies, gardening and shaping clay. Clay is so forgiving, it doesn't complain when you pound the heck out of it, if a piece doesn't work, you can squish the clay back down to a lump and start again.

Like planting a seed and watching a flower emerge, there is something magical about seeing a piece come out of the kiln. First you have the uniformed clay, then you mold and glaze it to your vision and then there is the firing. Sometimes the end result is a happy accident. In either case, transforming a lump of clay into a mask, pot or vase gives me great joy.

Bonnie King has been working with clay since the 1970s. She has taken ceramic classes at Eastern Oregon State College, Blue Mountain Community College and Lane Community College. Even when she was getting her nursing degree and raising her two daughters, she found time to work with clay anywhere she could - in the basement, garage or at the kitchen table.

It was a happy day in 2009 when Ms. King discovered Clay Space. With the encouragement and help of Ellen Davidson, Jim Laub, Josh Allen and the community of potters at Clay Space, she has found a supportive place for expressing her ideas.

Renee Manford


I had been introduced to Clay Space while working at the Karin Clarke Gallery on Willamette Street a few years back. Jim Laub had come in and left some brochures about the studio spaces for rent. I went to check them out and have been hooked on Clay Space for several years now.


I really like landscapes, they are a major part of my work. My art consists mostly of acrylic paintings and sometimes I will venture into print making. Some of my paintings are started on location, with a plein air group or when vacationing and then later finished at the studio.


Come visit my studio and say hi, I'd love to see you there. Studio #4


My work is currently showing in the Gallery at the Watershed.


This space is a wonderful gallery representing eleven artists. Be sure to check it out.


reneemanford.com


facebook.com/gatws


thegalleryathewatershed.blogspot.com/



Karen Perkins


Karen has been working with clay for nearly 40 years. She has exhibited work sporadically throughout those years with more of a focus on exhibiting since retiring from public school teaching.

 

Karen taught middle school and high school art for 30 years. Many of her projects with students centered around public service and public art projects. Before and during this time, Karen taught ceramics through Maude Kerns Art Center, Lane Community College and Amazon Community Center. Karen was involved in helping Clay Space with some of our original class and studio plans. She began teaching occasional and specialty classes at Clay Space when she retired in 2011. We're glad to have her working with us!

 

She currently part of a 7-person show at the Maude Kerns Gallery running through February 9th. Stop by to see it!


Viz City interview with Karen for KLCC Radio on January 24, 2018.


Karen's pieces are wheel thrown forms, subsequently manipulated with hand building processes. By stretching and compressing after the piece comes off the wheel, each form emerges spontaneously, defining its own character. Frequently working with loose sketches, she often moves from original intent, following a trail that tangents the original idea. It’s a wander through the world of form, one piece evolving from the last.

 

Most pieces begin abstract in intent, with her interest following the grace of line or curve. The clay working process often yields a sense of story. Karen's many interests (horseback riding, kayaking, gardening and music making) are present in the forms of her work. Gathering curve imagery from following the movement of a horse’s withers or jaw line; tracing the flow of a tree branch. She loves to create lift in these pieces, working the feet to create lightness and a precarious relationship to the earth.

 

Pieces that reach out, suggesting gaping mouths, are at times bird-like, gestures of yearning, of request and of offering. "It pleases me to watch my images alternate between the absurd, a flowing form, and a croak, as I find strength in learning not to take myself too seriously." (Karen)

 

Karen works with a variety of clay bodies and methods. Many of her wheel thrown and altered pieces spend a lot of time in her lap, as they are formed and burnished. Most are then fired in sawdust to allow smoke to complete the coloration. Some are naked raku pieces which are dipped in a thick slip — it shrinks and cracks, allowing smoke to create patterns in the fire.

 

Her current stoneware pieces were created from an interest in forms that can survive in the environment of trees. We’ve been thru a lot of strife with our forests, losing trees to drought and ice storms. She mixes that imagery with a fascination for the stacked stone forms of Catavinia, Baja, and Utah: Rocks piled on rocks, piled on rocks. She imagines these as pieces that speak to the trees, with seedpods and eggs as offerings of hope.  Let us celebrate the rain!


Donna Yutzy

As a jewelry designer, I am tempted by textures and persuaded by patterns. These characteristics are inherent in every piece I produce, from a simple pin or pair of earrings to the most intricately woven chain, sculpted pendant, or paneled bracelet.

 

I make all of my jewelry from special clay that contains tiny particles of silver mined from recycled metal. Silver clay, as it is called, is a delightful and limitless medium. It can be shaped, carved, molded, stamped, and sculpted. And once it’s fired, it can be highly polished or less so, and finished with pearls, stones, glass beads, or other unusual artifacts.

 

Every piece is unique. Though I usually sketch out an idea ahead of time, I find that mood, materials, and the creative process often determine the final design. My most popular and best-selling pieces are usually ones that I made for myself.

 

The pieces in my current collection are inspired by nature — random swirls in sand or snow, the twists and turns of a tree branch, the motion of grasses swaying in the wind. A splash of gold adds warmth and brightness, in sharp contrast to Oregon’s dreary winter days. 

 

As an avid cyclist, I tend to thrive on forward motion. But designing and fashioning jewelry out of metal clay helps me feel calm and centered. In addition to teaching metal clay classes each month, I try to take at least one course annually from a new instructor to help generate inspiration and provide time for self-reflection.

In Memoriam July 2017

Nolan Blansit
My r
adfdsfselationship with clay began eight years ago. I took a throwing class with Tea Dhuorg. In short order I bought a wheel, a kiln, a slab roller and any other tools I thought I needed. Even though I was an Art Major in college, I had never found a medium so appealing as clay. 

I throw on the potters wheel and I hand build. Some pieces have elements of both methods. I make mostly functional pieces though some are so exaggerated they will only be used decoratively.??Early on I got into glaze development and through the years I have fired several thousand test tiles. The glazes I use are all from these tests and help to given my work a unique look.??As a studio member at Clay Space I have made friendships with other potters. We seem to inspire each other. I have also taken a couple of classes at Clay Space. There is always something to learn from other potters!

Norelationship with clay began eight years ago. I took a throwing class with Tea Dhuorg. In short order I bought a wheel, a kiln, a slab roller and any other tools I thought I needed. Even though I was an Art Major in college, I had never found a medium so appealing as clay. 
I throw on the potters wheel and I hand build. Some pieces have elements of both methods. I make mostly functional pieces though some are so exaggerated they will only be used decoratively.??Early on I got into glaze development and through the years I have fired several thousand test tiles. The glazes I use are all from these tests and help to given my work a unique look.??As a studio member at Clay Space I have made friendships with other potters. We seem to inspire each other. I have also taken a couple of classes at Clay Space. There is always something to learn from other potters!
My relationship with clay began eight years ago. I took a throwing class with Tea Dhuorg. In short order I bought a wheel, a kiln, a slab roller and any other tools I thought I needed. Even though I was an Art Major in college, I had never found a medium so appealing as clay. 
I throw on the potters wheel and I hand build. Some pieces have elements of both methods. I make mostly functional pieces though some are so exaggerated they will only be used decoratively.??Early on I got into glaze development and through the years I have fired several thousand test tiles. The glazes I use are all from these tests and help to given my work a unique look.??As a studio member at Clay Space I have made friendships with other potters. We seem to inspire each other. I have also taken a couple of classes at Clay Space. There is always something to learn from other potters!
My relationship with clay began in 2004. I took a throwing class with Tea Dhuorg. In short order, I bought a wheel, a kiln, a slab roller and any other tools I thought 
I needed. Even though I was an Art Major in college, I had never found a medium so appealing as clay.
I throw on the potters wheel and I hand-build. Some pieces have elements of both methods. I make mostly functional pieces though some are so exaggerated they will only be used decoratively.
Early on, I got into glaze development and through the years I have fired several thousand test tiles. The glazes I use are all from these tests and help to give my work a unique look.
As a studio member at Clay Space, I have made friendships with other potters. We seem to inspire each other. I have also taken a couple of classes at Clay Space. There is always something to learn from others potters!

In fond memory of Phoebe Gordon
July 15, 1955 – January 14, 2017


Phoebe Gordon

Artist Statement
I have been an artist all my life. I was drawing before I could write my name. As a child I was not allowed to just sit and watch cartoons without doing something else “constructive”, so my mother provided drawing paper and colored pencils. From this I learned to doodle in front of the TV.


In 1981 I received a BFA in Printmaking from the University of Oregon. For several years, I made multi-colored linoleum cuts and sold them in galleries around the country. Almost all of the images in these prints came from doodling in front of the TV. They were all very brightly-colored and the theme was always humor and the human form.


Eventually I moved on from printmaking. I spent several years making paper mache altarpieces and diaoramas while I was living in San Francisco. During this time the subject-matter never changed, and I was lucky to find an art dealer who appreciated my sense of humor. I don’t believe that art necessarily has to be all serious; I have always wanted to make art that makes people smile and see the humor in life. I also don’t believe that a person has to have an education in art to look at something in a gallery and appreciate it; recognizable forms and pleasing colors and design are something anyone can enjoy looking at.


For the last five years I have been making ceramic sculptures, a medium that was completely new to me. When I was learning the techniques, I decided to focus on Mexcian folk art as my subject-matter, as I’ve been a collector for many years. Since I collected mermaids, I first decided to try making my own and had many good results. I then moved on to making Day of the Dead pieces, which never seem to fail making people laugh. All of the sculptures I’ve made are whimsical, brightly-colored, and very detailed; most pieces take around 150 hours to complete.


I no longer doodle in front of the TV, as my hands are always covered in clay and I work at the studio where there is no TV. I doodle while I work!








Shannon Hardin



Damon Harris









Bonnie King








Renee Manford
Renee Manford
Karen Perkins
Karen Perkins
Donna Yutzy
Donna Yutzy



Nolan Blansit



Phoebe Gordon